A child’s body needs nutrition, not just food. Switching to a healthy diet can have a profound effect on children’s well-being. Eating well will help children maintain a healthy weight, boost immunity and stabilize their energy levels. It is important to understand that children are not born with a craving for pizza, cookies and lollipop. The conditioning happens over a period of time, as children are exposed to unhealthy food choices. It is important to reprogram a child’s food cravings so that they crave for healthier food. The focus should be on making kids eat more natural food than packaged and processed ones. Never try to force-feed children as they may develop eating disorders, which could have an impact on growth and development.

Kids have a strong impulse to imitate; don’t ask your child to eat broccoli when you are eating French fries. Try and cook more meals at home and take your children on a fun grocery shopping trip to the supermarket. Never use food as a reward or bribe. Introduce healthy new dishes every week, while continuing to serve one or two of their old favourites. Make learning about nutrition enjoyable by turning it into a game. One of the best ways to help your child form a relationship with food is by teaching them to connect with what they eat and how they feel.

Kids are eating more processed food than ever before; they are loaded with sugar and are extremely unhealthy. Stay away from processed food and encourage your child to eat homemade food. Blueberries, cranberries, chocolate flavored almond milk, milk with honey, kesar and badam, oatmeal with honey and raisins, banana and strawberry milk shake, fruit smoothies and whole grain breakfast cereals are healthy food options for children. Eating a nourishing breakfast is very important as it helps them focus in class.

Make learning about nutrition enjoyable by turning it into a game. One of the best ways to help your child form a relationship with food is by teaching them to connect with what they eat and how they feel
Avoid placing too many restrictions and don’t nag them about unhealthy choice of food. Never label food as good or bad; instead let your child know that calcium in milk will make them strong and vitamin A in carrots will give them good eye-sight.

Let them know you are happy when they choose fruit over a candy. Avoid feeding them in front of the television. Make sure you have at least one meal together as a family, as this habit fosters a strong sense of belonging, better communication and cultivates better eating habits in children.